Mysteries of Ancient Rome, Part 2 (Roma Sub Rosa)

The mystery novels that got me started on this topic are those by Steven Saylor, a series called Roma Sub Rosa (a Latin term for something done secretly). Paradoxically, one of the things I like about Saylor's series is also the thing that most sets my teeth on edge: it covers the same period and the same historical events as those dealt with in Roberts' SPQR series, but from a distinct outsider's point of view, which contrasts rather strongly with that of John Maddox Roberts' aristocratic insider, Decius Caecilius Metellus. The titles chosen for the two series indicates the essential differences between them: SPQR (the motto of Republic: Senatus Populusque Romanus, the Senate and People of Rome) seeks to acquaint the reader with the values that made the Roman republic great and whose collapse led to the Republic's demise and the rise of the military dictatorship we call the Roman Empire, while Roma Sub Rosa presents the post-Machiavellian view that Rome's government was always the private club of a powerful elite who arranged things to their own satisfaction and mutual benefit through secret and often unsavory insider deals.

Catilina's Riddle: A Novel of Ancient Rome (Novels of Ancient Rome)The Catiline Conspiracy (SPQR II)So it might be best for anyone interested in gaining insight into the last generation of the Roman Republic, how and why it collapsed, to read both series, taking into account the different assessments of the state of Rome at that time which are implicit in each author's treatment of the historical events. One might read, say, Roberts' The Catiline Conspiracy and Saylor's Catilina's Riddle and see one of the most notorious and significant political intrigues of the late Roman Republic from two very distinct points of view, one sympathetic to the republican point of view (which saw Catilina and his co-conspirators as dangerous monsters) and the other from a more "modern" view that sympathizes with the young Roman patricians who were willing to pitch in with Catilina and conspire to murder their own fathers in their beds.

I have to admit that I find Saylor's mysteries less congenial than Roberts', mostly because he goes out of his way to present a "minority viewpoint" which, presumably, is intended to seem more "realistic" to modern readers (whom the author seems to expect to be cynical about political figures). However, Saylor's novels are well-crafted and engaging as mysteries, regardless of what one may think about their political perspective, so I recommend them. Here is an overview of the series, using the same general categories as those I used to describe the SPQR series:

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